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Love it or hate it

I had a very pleasant visit to the area of Eton and Windsor over the weekend, staying with two good friends of mine, and on Sunday morning made a visit to the main interest. That castle, the one that overlooks the surrounding countryside so solidly and stands so majestically and beautifully. It’s been a great number of years since I was last at Windsor, or its castle, and thoroughly enjoyed being a tourist for a couple of hours, in the spring sunshine, and wandering around the town. Shops have come and gone, as they do in ensuing years, and my man and I wandered around with no particular plan, down one road here, along a side street, turn left or right as the fancy took us. And then as we passed an expensive looking gallery, he asked me if I wanted to go in? Yes, I’d like that. We walked in, as visitors, nothing to show to anyone that we were any different to any other visitor. We both looked at the art, not together particularly, just looking at the paintings in our own time. The girl who worked there did what gallery staff should do, and made full eye contact, smiled, and asked if there was anything in particular that we liked. I smiled at her, and nodded at a painting infront of me, and said evenly “What happened to her arm?” and she followed my gaze and said equally evenly “That’s how the artist wanted to depict it”. I frowned slightly and asked “Why?” then went on to say what a fabulously painted picture it was, I am an artist and can see how much work has gone into it, I admired the image of the girl sitting in the chair, the setting, the representational painting that was virtually a photograph, but the wrist of the girl was all wrong, infact I had presumed the model was deformed to start with, with an amputation, since the wrist literally looked like it had been cut off just above the hand. Bearing in mind the rest of the picture was astonishingly correct in its depiction, even down to the patterning in the carpet, why indeed had the artist been so negligent in painting her hand and wrist? I know if I were to buy the painting even at the high price that it was, that it would annoy me for ever more, since I’d always be looking at the fault within the painting.

The gallery girl and I chatted, she was friendly, and nice, and easy to talk to. They had some Rolf Harris paintings there too, and I admired two of them, particularly one of a Venetian canal, full of light and colour, veridian and lime green and reds all full of contrast and life. And then I looked at the two tiger paintings that were also his, and couldn’t understand that they were even the same artist. They looked heavy and wooden in comparison. What had gone wrong there? I’m not overly critical of artwork, I know if I like it or not, and can tell if its captured the ambiance or not of the subject, whether a famous artist has painted it or an amateur. But, I do have to wonder, at a big gallery like that one (one of a well known chain) showing work like that. For those prices I’d want something closer to perfection, no matter who has painted it. And certainly if I was a buyer I would too!!!!!

I was pleased though, that as we talked, the gallery girl listened to what I was talking about, about speculative art, and framing, and making your life as an artist, and made the comment “You seem to understand as much about the financial side of art as the art” and I agreed that I needed to. That it is as important as the painting of pictures for me. I am in the business of selling my paintings, so I have to be. And I know that you can’t say what is THE best painting, because anyone would argue with you, as they would prefer their own favourite against yours, because they had seen and picked up on something that you hadn’t. And that is because brains are wired up differently and react in diverse ways to various stimuli.

So perhaps, its a wonder that any artwork makes the connection then, between artist and buyer. I know I am always absolutely delighted when someone says “I love it!” about a painting of mine that they have bought. And know then, that I have got it right. That connection.  And that’s what its all about!!!

I've been an artist all of my life, and my paintings now hang on walls in Europe, USA and Canada. I'm working on getting them on the other continents! My wide range of artwork has been exhibited nearer to home in the East Midlands, with the Guild of Erotic Artists at Beaumont Hall Studios in Hertfordshire, and at "Erotica", Olympia, London. I have also been featured alongside my work in the Guild of Erotic Artists book (volume 2). I love to create dramatic interest in my pictures, whether it’s to paint an unusual landscape, or just to utilise dramatic lighting in my figure drawings or strong colour in my animal portraits. Delighting in the spontaneous tendencies of watercolour adds an interesting and distinctive look to my paintings, some of which are purposefully ambiguous, enabling the viewer to use their own interpretation of my artwork. I also love to hide images, and humour within my paintings, whether it’s a secret message, or an erotic couple hidden within a landscape, or even an erotic landscape where the couple are camouflaged as the features of the land itself. I am equally happy painting in oils, acrylics or watercolours and love to draw with pencil or ink. I have also developed the very effective method of drawing using white pencil on black card which creates dramatic pictures by just picking out where the light catches the body and leaving the rest of the image to the imagination, in darkness. I can also utilise many different styles, whether it is realistic, abstract, surrealistic, erotic, fantasy or camouflage art where something is hidden within the painting. I'm just passionate about my art, whatever I paint! But, it doesn't matter how many landscapes or pet portraits I paint, its always the erotic stuff that people are interested in! I started blogging to share some of the strange conversations I have with the people I meet. But its evolved into far more than that now.

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